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Raphanus | Materia Medica by John Henry Clarke

Raphanus

Raphanus | Materia Medica by John Henry Clarke

Raphanus sativus. Radish. (And R. raphanistrum. Wild Radish.) N. O. Cruciferae. Tincture from fresh root immediately before flowering in spring. Tincture of whole fresh plant.

Clinical : Alcoholism. Amblyopia. Axilla, inflamed gland in. Breasts, pains beneath; between. Catalepsy. Cough. Diarrhoea. Dysmenorrhoea. Emaciation. Epistaxis. Faintness. Fever. Flatulence. Flushings. Headache. Heart, palpitation of. Heel, pain in. Hernia. Hysteria. Insomnia. Lienteria. Liver, affections of; abscess of. Menorrhagia. Metrorrhagia. Myopia. Numbness. Nymphomania. Å’sophagus, affections of. Olecranon, pain in. Pemphigus. (Priapism.) Pregnancy, toothache of. Seborrhoea. Tonsillitis. Toothache. Yawning.

Characteristics : Nusser proved both the Garden Radish and the Wild Radish (the former probably only a cultivated variety of the latter), and of the Garden Radish he took tinctures of the long, round, and black (the favourite in Germany) varieties, and ate the different radishes themselves. The Schema contains his symptoms, with others from effects of eating radishes; and provings by Curie made on a woman with 15th and 30th dilutions. These provings developed many symptoms which have proved to be characteristics. Rap. affords a marked example of a common article of diet being at the same time a poison and a medicine. A patient of mine, a man, has these symptoms whenever he eats even a single radish: “Burning sensation in epigastrium, followed by hot eructations, lasting a whole day and ending in a headache.” Turnips (Brassica rapa) produce in him a similar effect, but in less degree. The leaves of Rap. are said to antidote its roots, and the arum root is said to antidote the effects of Radish leaves (Cooper). The hysterical, mental, and uterine symptoms of Curie’s prover were very well marked; a state approaching catalepsy was induced “On returning a little to herself she was unable to speak or stir.” The “globus” symptoms are as marked as with any other remedy: A number of balls ascend from abdomen to throat.” “A hot, foreign body goes up like a ball from uterus and stops at the beginning of the throat, where it feels like a morsel too large to be swallowed, thence descends to the stomach, causing a sensation of something hard to digest, leaving an empty sensation with hunger.” Many of the symptoms of Rap. seem to make for the throat, and a case of mine bears on this. A man, 43, after taking Lyc. reported this condition: “Good deal of pain in back, sides, and body, < after eating. Cannot lie on either side. Very sinking at 4 a.m. Bowels confined. Passing wind after severe pain.” Rap. 30 every three hours was prescribed. His next report, a week later, was this: “He felt the first dose of Rap. lie at his throat all night; it gradually passed down and the pains got better. After two or three days his water became thick like soap suds. [Turbid urine with yeast-like sediment is characteristic of Rap.] Can lie on sides better. Bowels less confined. Wind less.” Rap. is one of the most flatulent of remedies. Wind accumulates so that it almost stops the breathing. The most characteristic feature is when the flatus cannot be passed either up or down. Such a condition occur ring after abdominal operations has been relieved by Rap. Many symptoms, physical and mental, seemed to rise from the uterus, culminating in a very pronounced attack of nymphomania. With these was aversion to her own sex and to children, especially girls. Other mental symptoms were: Capricious manner, stupefaction, sadness, tears; and this at times alternated with hopefulness. Brain excitement. One prover had sense of intoxication on waking in the morning. Another felt intoxicated after dinner, though only water was drunk. This should give Rap. a place in some forms of alcoholism. Extreme anxiety, with feeling of impending death. The following case from Allen’s Appendix is fairly typical of Rap. poisoning. A man ate freely of radishes. There after he began to feel nausea and drawing pains, extending from sternum to middle of abdomen. This went on for about a fortnight, when it 7 p.m. on May 26th he began to feel very ill. The pains became

Raphanus | Materia Medica by John Henry Clarke

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